PUBLIC NOTICE

Reference is made to the Uganda Revenue Authority changes in tax invoice administration, which made it mandatory for all VAT registered taxpayers to issue e-invoices and e-receipts under the Electronic Fiscal Receipting and Invoicing System (EFRIS).

Uganda Civil Aviation Authority (UCAA) reminds affected suppliers/providers that it is only EFRIS invoices that are accepted for payment.

MANAGEMENT

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS IN RELATION TO COVID-19 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES AT ENTEBBE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

All travelers whose body temperature is NOT above 37.5°C (99.5°F), do not have persistent cough, difficulty in breathing, or other flu – like symptoms, and have a negative COVID -19 Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) test certificate issued within 72 hours from the time of sample collection to boarding aircraft shall be allowed to enter or depart Uganda in complaince with the following:

  1. When should passengers to Uganda undertake the COVID-19 PCR test?
  • Arriving passengers should have a negative COVID-19 PCR test certificate issued within 72 hours from the time of sample collection to boarding aircraft leaving country of origin. This excludes transit time within the terminal building. Travelers who have had COVID-19 vaccination and hold a vaccination certificate must still present a negative COVID-19 PCR test certificate.
  • What are the other requirements for arriving passengers?
  • Passengers without a negative COVID-19 PCR test Certificate undertaken within 72 hours from the time of sample collection to boarding aircraft leaving country of origin will not be allowed into Uganda.
  • All arriving passengers from Category 1 & 2 countries will be subjected to a COVID -19 PCR test on arrival in Uganda in addition to the negative test undertaken from their country of origin. However, individuals from Category 2 countries who have received full COVID-19 vaccination and have no signs of COVID-19 will be exempted from the arrival PCR tests.
  • Individuals who test positive to COVID-19 shall be treated according to the Ministry of Health protocol for COVID-19.
  • Which countries fall in Category 1 & 2?
  • Category 1 – India (only returning Ugandans from India holding Ugandan passports are currently allowed into the country). Non –Ugandans from Category 1 will only be allowed in if they have spent 28 days in a quarantine center in a Category 3 country. On arrival in Uganda, they will be subjected to a PCR test at their cost.
  • Category 2 countries include United States of America (USA), United Kingdom (UK), United Arab Emirates (UAE), Turkey, South Africa, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and South Sudan.
  • Category 3 – All countries not in Categories 1 & 2. These will not be subject to a PCR test on arrival.
  • What is the cost of a PCR test undertaken on arrival?

65 US Dollars or equivalent.

  • What are the requirements for departing passengers?
  • Passengers departing Uganda through Entebbe International Airport (EIA) must have an authentic negative COVID-19 PCR test certificate issued within 72 hours from the time of sample collection to boarding aircraft.
  •  All COVID-19 PCR test certificates for departing passengers MUST indicate TRAVEL as the intended purpose of test.
  • Passengers departing EIA are required to know, understand, and interpret COVID-19 requirements of the country they are travelling to.
  • How do passengers overcome curfew and cross border travel restrictions while in Uganda?

Passengers departing in curfew time, and or from districts beyond Kampala with a valid air ticket shall be allowed to proceed to their destination airport by presentation of the passenger ticket to the authorities as evidence of going to the airport. Similarly, arriving passengers can present their passenger ticket or boarding pass as evidence of travel from the airport. Branded Airport taxis are also available from the airport.

  • What is required when dropping or picking up passengers from Entebbe Airport?

Drivers (dropping or picking up passengers) should have evidence such as passenger ticket and or Airport parking ticket (if coming from the Airport).

  • What are the COVID 19 PCR test requirements in relation to children?

Children of three (3) years and below are exempted from the requirement for a negative PCR test certificate as long as they are accompanied by parents holding a negative COVID -19 PCR test certificate.

  • What are the requirements for air transportation of human remains into the country?

The following conditions should be fulfilled:

  • Medical certificate of cause of death
  • Post-mortem report or Comprehensive Medical Report from the attending doctor/health facility
  • Embalming certificate (including embalming certificate for death due to COVID-19)
  • Copy of passport/identification document of the deceased (The original passport/travel document/identification document to be presented to immigration authorities)
  • Import license/import authorization from the Director General of Health Services
  • Appropriate packaging – wrapped in a water proof body bag then placed in a zinc lined coffin and outer metal or wooden box
  • The documents will be verified by Port Health and the casket shall be decontaminated by Port Health on arrival
  • The burial of bodies of COVID-19 victims will be conducted following the existing procedure for scientific burials.

FOR PRINT COPY: Download pdf

S13/21 COVID-19 HEALTH MEASURES FOR ENTEBBE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
GENERAL (GEN)

The Government of the Republic of Uganda has issued the following directives effective 3rd July 2021 till 31st July 2021, on COVID-19 health measures at Entebbe International Airport:

  1. All travelers whose body temperature is NOT above 37.5°C (99.5°F), do not have a persistent cough, difficulty in breathing or other flu-like symptoms; have negative COVID-19 Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) test certificate carried out within 72 hours from the time of sample collection shall be allowed to enter or depart Uganda in compliance with categorization in 3 below.
    i. All COVID-19 PCR certificates for departing travelers MUST indicate TRAVEL as the intended purpose of test;
    ii. Entebbe International Airport Port Health shall approve for arrival or departure a negative PCR COVID-19 test certificate undertaken within 72 hours from the time of sample collection. This excludes transit time at the terminal building;
    iii. Travelers enroute to EIA must have had a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken 72 hours from the time of sample collection and hold a certificate without which he/she will not be allowed to enter Uganda;
    iv. For travelers presenting with COVID-19 signs and symptoms or other infectious disease will be subjected to secondary screening and will be taken for further management. If found to have an infectious disease, they will be taken for further management at the infectious disease hospital;
    v. Travelers without a negative COVID-19 PCR test certificate undertaken within 72 hours from the time of sample collection will not be allowed into Uganda;
    vi. Travelers departing EIA are required to know, understand, and interpret COVID-19 requirements of the country they are travelling to;
    vii. Travelers who have had COVID-19 vaccination and hold a certificate must still present a negative COVID-19 PCR test certificate within 72 hours from the time of sample collection to boarding aircraft. This is because the vaccine is not 100% protective, and it also takes several days/weeks to begin protection;
    viii. Individuals who test positive to COVID-19 test shall be treated according to the Ministry of Health protocol for COVID- 19;
  2. i. All crew that are fully vaccinated for COVID-19 will have a free entry and exit through Entebbe International Airport (unless if they have any signs and symptoms of COVID-19 or other infectious disease)
    ii. Crew who are not fully vaccinated for COVID-19 will have to present a negative PCR test undertaken within 30 days.
  3. All arriving passengers from category 1 & 2 will be subjected to a PCR COVID-19 test on arrival in Uganda in addition to the negative PCR test undertaken from their country of origin.
    i. Affected countries include.
    a. Category 1- India (only returning Ugandans holding Ugandan passports). Non-Ugandans from category 1 will be allowed in if they will have spent 28 days in a quarantine center in a category 3 country. On arrival in Uganda, they will be subjected to a PCR test at their own cost.
    b. Category 2- United States of America, United Kingdom, United Arab Emirates (UAE), Turkey, South Africa, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, and South Sudan.
    c. Category 3 – All countries not in Categories 1 & 2. These will not be subject to PCR test.
    ii. Individuals from Category 2 countries who have received full COVID-19 vaccination and have no signs of COVID-19 will be exempted from the PCR tests.
  4. A travelling child 3 years and below, accompanied by parents holding a negative COVID-19 PCR test is exempted from negative PCR test certificate
  5. Passengers travelling out of the country will be required to have an Authentic Valid Negative PCR test Certificate and abide by the travel, health and COVID-19 related requirements of the Destination Country.
  6. Passengers arriving in the curfew time, and or from districts beyond Kampala with a valid air ticket and boarding pass shall be allowed to proceed to their hotels and/or residences.
  7. Passengers departing in curfew time, and or from districts beyond Kampala with a valid air ticket shall be allowed to proceed to their destination airport by presentation of the passenger ticket to the authorities as evidence of going to the airport.
  8. Drivers should have evidence that they have come from the Airport (such as airport parking ticket or passenger ticket) to drop or pick up passengers.
  9. Air transportation of human remains into the country is allowed if the following conditions are fulfilled:
    a) Medical Certificate of Cause of Death;
    b) Post-mortem report or Comprehensive Medical Report from the attending doctor/health facility;
    c) Embalming certificate (including embalming certificate for death due to COVID-19);
    d) Copy of passport/identification document of the deceased (The original passport/ travel document/ identification document to be presented to immigration authorities);
    e) Import license/ import authorization from the Director General of Health Services;
    f) Appropriate packaging- wrapped in a waterproof body bag then placed in a zinc lined coffin and outer metal or wooden box;
    g) The document will be verified by port health and the casket on arrival shall be decontaminated by port health;
    h) The burial of bodies of COVID-19 victims will be conducted following the existing procedures for scientific burials.

(AIP SUP 11/21 is hereby replaced)

For detailed Notam: Download PDF

Gov’t revises Covid-19 testing period for travellers

Kampala, Uganda | THE INDEPENDENT | The Ministry of Health has revised the Covid-19 testing period for travelers to and out of Uganda.

According to the ministry, effective July 3, the travellers arriving or departing from Uganda will have to present a negative PCR COVID-19 test certificate issued within 72 hours before their travel. Initially, the timeline for testing for Covid before travel was 120 hours.

Dr Henry Mwebesa, the Director-General Health Services in a statement released on Tuesday says that the validity period begins on the day the sample was collected for testing.

Mwebesa explained that the move is a result of Uganda experiencing a resurgence of COVID-19 and that several variants are circulating both in-country and across the world.

Recently, the Minister of Health Dr Ruth Aceng noted that Uganda is recording a high number of new infections in the second wave because of five major variants that have very aggressive transmission rates. These are the local strain (identified as B.1.617), Delta (B.1.617.2 first identified in India), Beta (B.1.351 from South Africa), Alpha (B.1.117 identified in the UK) and Eta (identified as B.1.525).

The latest measures come days after the United Kingdom and United Arab Emirates put Uganda on a red list due to surging COVID-19 cases, with an average of 1,000 cases recorded daily.

The British High Commission in Uganda noted that on June 24, UK Ministers decided to add Uganda to the red list of border measures. The measures will be implemented effectively “at 4 am on June 30.” The move follows the latest scientific evidence about the risk of community transmissions of COVID-19 variants,” the British High Commission letter reads.

RwandAir also suspended flights to Uganda over the rising number of COVID-19 cases. Travelers from Uganda are required to undertake mandatory quarantine of 7 days.

Currently, travelers leaving the country are required to present a negative PCR COVID-19 test certificate issued within 120 hours before their departure time while incoming passengers must have a negative PCR COVID-19 test certificate issued within 72 hours before their flight.

These guidelines came into effect October 1st, 2020, when the government reopened Entebbe International Airport for commercial flights after a six-month partial shutdown. In the first week after the resumption, over 50 departing passengers missed their flights because of the failure to present valid PCR COVID-19 test certificates.

Meanwhile, passengers coming from India and nine other high-risk countries such as the United States of America, Kenya, Ethiopia, United Arab Emirates, and Tanzania have to take a PCR test on arrival at Entebbe International Airport. Also, those from South Africa, Turkey, South Sudan, and Tanzania are eligible for the test.

The Uganda Civil Aviation Authority-UCAA figures show that passenger numbers at Entebbe Airport dropped in May, whereby 77,063 passengers transited through the airport down from 85,050 passengers recorded in April.

Also, the daily passenger numbers dropped in May to 2,485 from 2,835 in April and 2,693 in March 2021.

Adopted from: The Independent June 30, 2021

Uganda to Join The Growing List of African Countries to Have Launched Satellites

Nabakooba also stressed the possibility of increased private sector investment in space science, technology, research, and innovation, including foreign direct investment and collaborations.

“Space science is new in Uganda, and we will seek to work with foreign countries like Russia, Japan, Israel, among others, that implemented space science before so that we can exchange knowledge and use their research as a benchmark to improve on ours.”

Mr. Chris Nsamba, Founder and CEO of the African Space Research Program, said if the satellite is launched, it will help improve weather forecasts used by the Uganda Civil Aviation Authority.

“With the change in climate, sometimes the unpredictable weather has been delaying some flights from Entebbe International Airport. But when the satellite is launched, the Uganda Civil Aviation Authority will have more accurate weather forecasts to allow flights to take off and land at the scheduled time,” Nsamba explained.

With the satellite launch in place, the government is also working on establishing an education network around space technology. This will see Ugandan space engineers trained in Uganda other than sending them to other countries for training. Makerere University recently started a teaching program in space technology.

President Museveni has emphasized the educational benefits of a space program —pointing to the new space technology program at Makerere University’s College of Engineering, Design, Art, and Technology.

“I have asked my officials to work closely with the European Organization for Nuclear Research in Switzerland regarding the space program. This will create an opportunity for having a space camp in Uganda,” Museveni said during his concluded 2021 State of the Union speech.

The Ministry of ICT has said the station will help in developing Uganda’s space capabilities in a well-coordinated and harmonized manner —projecting benefits such as;

  • Increased evidence-based technology information for planning and decision-making.
  • Improved Space Science and Technology infrastructure to support research for the industrial development of the country.
  • Improved Defence and Security through improved capabilities for cross-border movement monitoring and surveillance.
  • Increased Private Sector investment in space science, technology, research, and innovation.
  • Increase in Public servants (Human Resources) to facilitate the development of space technology in Uganda.

There was no exact timeframe for the launch but all we know it will be in 2022 if all goes as planned.

Reporter’s Note: Article written with inputs from AGU PUBLICATIONS.

Adopted from: The PcTech Magazine July 3, 2021

Government puts up drastic measures at airport due to surging COVID-19 cases

65 travelers from category 2 countries have tested positive to covid-19 at Entebbe international airport. The ministry of health team working at the airports says travelers have started forging PCR tests into the country from their origin. They say they are faced with a challenge where travelers get stuck with no money for a repeat test as airline operators do not inform them of the procure.

Adopted from: NTV Saturday May 29, 2021

PUBLIC NOTICE – PRIME MEDIA

Uganda Civil Aviation Authority (UCAA) informs the general public that Prime Media Limited ceased to be the agent for selling and marketing advertising space at Entebbe International Airport owing to expiry of their contract on May 1, 2021.

For inquiries on advertising at the Airport or any other inquiries relating to this matter, contact the Department of Marketing and Commercial Services at the Passenger Terminal Building, 2nd Floor, Entebbe International Airport.

Tel: +256-31-235 3000, +256-41-4353000

Email :   or

UGANDA CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY

Safety, Safety  and  Safety

Supply Of Cable Test And Fault Location System

Uganda Civil Aviation Authority (UCAA) is a Government Statutory entity responsible for the promotion of the safe, secure and efficient development of Civil Aviation inside and outside Uganda

  1. The Authority has allocated funds to be used for the following procurement.
NO.               Procurement subjectBid Security  (Ug.shs)Pre–bid meeting
UCAA/SUPLS/20-21/00216Supply Of Cable Test And Fault Location System3,000,000/=Thursday 10th June, 2021 at 11:00am, UCAA Passenger Terminal Building.

2.   Bidding will be conducted in accordance with the open domestic bidding procedures contained in the Public Procurement and Disposal of Public Assets Act, 2003, and are open to all bidders from eligible source countries.

3.   A complete set of bidding documents in Englishmay be purchased by interested bidders upon payment of a non-refundable fee of Ug.shs 100,000/= (One hundred thousand shillings only) payable in cash  at UCAA cash office, 2nd floor, Entebbe International Airport Passenger Terminal Building. The document should be collected immediately after payment from the Procurement Office in the terminal building . 

4.   Bids must be delivered to the address below on or before 24th May 2021 at 11:30 am. (All bids must be accompanied by a bid security as indicated abo

     Bids will be opened in the presence of the bidders’ representatives who choose to attend at the address below on 24th May 2021 at 11:35 am in the UCAA Boardroom.

5.   Bidding documents may be inspected at the office of:                                                                                            

                            Manager Procurement , UCAA Head Office Building              

                              2nd Floor, Airport Road, Entebbe 

                                       P.O. Box 5536 Kampala, Tel: 0312/0414-352050

For details: Download pdf

How the new cities can open Uganda’s aviation landscape

Aviation, as the lifeblood of the global economy and a pillar of the most important cities in the world, has never been glaringly evident as it is today.

Its catalytic effect on industry, the potential for employment, as a vessel for business travel, transportation of goods and social connectivity, cannot be overstated. Across the world, it is now common for an entire city to be built with an airport at its core. Cities and trade hubs are increasingly becoming ‘aerotropolis’ or airport cities.

On July 1, 2020, seven municipalities of Arua, Gulu, Jinja, Mbarara, Fort Portal, Masaka and Mbale acquired city status overnight. Eight more are in the offing. While their broader economic benefits might be apparent, what is their implication to Uganda’s aviation industry?

The seven cities could be the spark to ignite the growth of the air transport industry, with a roll-on effect on the economy. With 500, 000 direct and indirect jobs so far created, Kenya and Tanzania are already reaping the benefits of developing robust domestic markets on the back of secondary cities and tourism hotspots. Imagine what just a fraction of these jobs would do for the current youth unemployment in the new cities.

The new cities should start creating structures aligned to the national aviation strategy to support air transport. For instance, cities like Masaka, Mbale and Fort Portal should be constructing two-kilometre runways with terminal buildings, offices, waiting areas and social amenities like wifi and toilets.

Bigger cities with airfields like Mbarara, Gulu and Arua should be considering expanding and upgrading them to regional airports that accommodate direct international traffic. Fortunately, these are already catered for upgrade in the 20-year National Civil Aviation Master Plan [2014-2033].

Airports, airlines and passengers do not operate in a vacuum. Their aeronautical benefits are obvious. Passengers stimulate local economies surrounding the airports, through direct and indirect jobs, businesses like suppliers, drivers, hotels and lodges that support aviation.

The ability of cities with good air-connectivity to receive international travellers directly by air cannot be overstated. It takes tourists, numerous hours to travel across the country to remote tourist attractions. If a tour operator like Abercrombie or Kent landed a Boeing 737 in Gulu city, it would take tourists a much shorter two-hour drive to Murchison Falls national park. If at Mbarara, the five-hour strenuous drive to Bwindi Impenetrable forest national park would be shortened.

Upgrading Arua airport to handle small-to-medium airliners would plunge Arua city into a trade and humanitarian hub for Central African Republic, DR Congo and South Sudan. The city is already linking these countries by land. The same can be said of potential regional gateways like Jinja, Mbarara and Gulu, whose own local economies are yearning for such a catalyst.

To achieve this, local city authorities require an umbrella of a national mindset that advances the local aviation sector with a view to boosting the local economy. This needs deliberate interventions to be undertaken by the central government through the line ministry of Works and Transport and all stakeholders.

For the aviation potential to be achieved, we must break the red tape and barriers to setting up air transport companies and businesses. We need conducive and efficient environment for growth of such businesses. Why do our neighbours have hundreds of licensed domestic airlines and charter companies operating domestic and international routes, yet Uganda has a handful?

The central government must be encouraged to reduce or give tax holidays to investors looking to set up air transport companies in the country. The more the airlines, the greater the economies of scale for the average Ugandan traveller. Ugandans are gradually beginning to understand that time is money.

If the cost of air travel can be reduced or brought closer to that of driving an SUV to upcountry destinations, many would opt to fly instead of driving. For example, a businessman having breakfast in Arua flies two hours to Kampala, transacts business, loads cargo on a truck, has lunch, and flies back to  Arua for dinner, as opposed to taking two or three days, given the road, weather and traffic conditions.

With the revival of Uganda Airlines, expansions at Entebbe international airport can guarantee the long-term sustainability of the national airline if it has a domestic route network to support it. A traveller could book a flight from Mbarara to Dubai or Mumbai, or a tourist from Brussels can fly straight to Kisoro, avoiding the nightmare of traffic in Kampala or Masaka roads.

A domestic route network supports local businesses with market while also making the national carrier more competitive in the broader market. From the context of the current global pandemic where countries across the globe are easing up travel restrictions, it is in the same vein that domestic travel could bolster the national airline’s revenue streams and help it weather the storm better.

Some may argue that Uganda’s size doesn’t justify investment in multiple airports. However, if we want to grow our new cities into vibrant metropolises, business and industrial hubs, airports must be the focal point and aviation the pillar of growth. They will help decongest our narrow roads, reduce road rage and carnage, and connect our farmers’ produce to markets out of the country. Why wouldn’t a cargo plane fly our coffee from Arua to Europe or our tea from southwestern Uganda to regional markets in Africa and beyond?

Growing airport infrastructure requires a focused approach, in line with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Standards and Recommended Practices (SARPs). It necessitates an airports authority independent from the Civil Aviation Authority who is the industry regulator.

An independent airports authority, unlike the current department under CAA, would be crucial now because of the increasing number of airports and forecasted passenger growth figures.

All that is needed is a government-led framework to actualize the required reforms. The Ugandan middleclass is growing. Businessmen and farmers will soon be able to switch to air transport. The airports authority would prevent any conflicts of interest between the regulatory and service provision, which would improve efficiency in airport operations.

Professional unions like the Uganda Professional Pilots Association (UPPA), the Uganda Civil Aviation Authority, ministry of Works and Transport and the new cities with their leadership, need to sit down and deliberate on how to leverage these new opportunities into tangible gains for their respective economies and the whole country at large.

The author is a line pilot with Uganda Airlines and chairman of the Pilots General Assembly at the Uganda Professional Pilots Association

Adopted from: The Observer of April 15, 2021